The Great Escape - Music & More

In the summer of 2021, Geese emerged from out of nowhere, sparking a hype cycle unlike anything that had been seen for a young American rock band in recent memory. Suddenly a band that had previously planned to release some music, break up, and go away to college was touring the world. And during this entire process, that very same band everyone was getting to know ceased to exist. On a practical level, Geese are still the group we were introduced to in 2021. But spiritually, Geese have returned as an entirely different prospect. Their new album 3D Country is the sound of a restless, adventurous band redefining themselves. Anyone who has seen Geese live recently might’ve noticed the band adopted a different vibe onstage — more of a volcanic, unpredictable aesthetic. It turns out that wasn’t a flipside to the recordings of Projector, but foreshadowing that there was more to the story. Knowing they were now beyond teenage basement experiments and were instead making something for an audience who would hear it, Geese felt emboldened. “When we were writing Projector it was about narrowing the scope, trying to do more with less,” Gus Green says. “When we started writing for 3D Country we were trying to do a lot more and seeing what worked and what didn’t.” At the same time, they’re well aware of how significant a departure they’ve made. “As music listeners, we all appreciate bands who change over time, and are comfortable with risk,” Cameron Winter adds. It wasn’t necessarily a given that Geese would overhaul their sound, but with age came new adventures and interests. “Maybe the last record was our teenage angst and 3D Country is our newfound twenty-something arrogance,” he quips.

In the summer of 2021, Geese emerged from out of nowhere, sparking a hype cycle unlike anything that had been seen for a young American rock band in recent memory. Suddenly a band that had previously planned to release some music, break up, and go away to college was touring the world. And during this entire process, that very same band everyone was getting to know ceased to exist. On a practical level, Geese are still the group we were introduced to in 2021. But spiritually, Geese have returned as an entirely different prospect. Their new album 3D Country is the sound of a restless, adventurous band redefining themselves. Anyone who has seen Geese live recently might’ve noticed the band adopted a different vibe onstage — more of a volcanic, unpredictable aesthetic. It turns out that wasn’t a flipside to the recordings of Projector, but foreshadowing that there was more to the story. Knowing they were now beyond teenage basement experiments and were instead making something for an audience who would hear it, Geese felt emboldened. “When we were writing Projector it was about narrowing the scope, trying to do more with less,” Gus Green says. “When we started writing for 3D Country we were trying to do a lot more and seeing what worked and what didn’t.” At the same time, they’re well aware of how significant a departure they’ve made. “As music listeners, we all appreciate bands who change over time, and are comfortable with risk,” Cameron Winter adds. It wasn’t necessarily a given that Geese would overhaul their sound, but with age came new adventures and interests. “Maybe the last record was our teenage angst and 3D Country is our newfound twenty-something arrogance,” he quips.

5400863093112
3D Country [Limited Edition Crystal Clear LP]
Artist: Geese
Format: Vinyl
New: Not in stock
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. 2122
2. 3D Country
3. Cowboy Nudes
4. I See Myself
5. Undoer
6. Crusades
7. Gravity Blues
8. Mysterious Love
9. Domoto
10. Tomorrow's Crusades
11. St. Elmo

More Info:

In the summer of 2021, Geese emerged from out of nowhere, sparking a hype cycle unlike anything that had been seen for a young American rock band in recent memory. Suddenly a band that had previously planned to release some music, break up, and go away to college was touring the world. And during this entire process, that very same band everyone was getting to know ceased to exist. On a practical level, Geese are still the group we were introduced to in 2021. But spiritually, Geese have returned as an entirely different prospect. Their new album 3D Country is the sound of a restless, adventurous band redefining themselves. Anyone who has seen Geese live recently might’ve noticed the band adopted a different vibe onstage — more of a volcanic, unpredictable aesthetic. It turns out that wasn’t a flipside to the recordings of Projector, but foreshadowing that there was more to the story. Knowing they were now beyond teenage basement experiments and were instead making something for an audience who would hear it, Geese felt emboldened. “When we were writing Projector it was about narrowing the scope, trying to do more with less,” Gus Green says. “When we started writing for 3D Country we were trying to do a lot more and seeing what worked and what didn’t.” At the same time, they’re well aware of how significant a departure they’ve made. “As music listeners, we all appreciate bands who change over time, and are comfortable with risk,” Cameron Winter adds. It wasn’t necessarily a given that Geese would overhaul their sound, but with age came new adventures and interests. “Maybe the last record was our teenage angst and 3D Country is our newfound twenty-something arrogance,” he quips.

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