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A substantial survey of a modern landmark in French organ literature, full of colour, mystery and joy. If any organ music anticipates the explosion of lush harmony, unified musico-theological ideas and radical innovation with which Olivier Messiaen renewed the long tradition of French organ music, it is L'orgue mystique by Messiaen's one-time teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, Charles Tournemire. In a Bachian spirit of comprehensiveness, Tournemire wrote 51 suites for nearly every Sunday and select feast days of the church year. Gregorian chant permeates Tournemire's music, with motives drawn from the appointed proper chants for the day. On this 5CD collection, the Dutch organist presents 23 of the suites, in whole or in part, and arranges them according to the church year, with individual discs dedicated to the Sundays around Christmas and Epiphany, Easter, Pentecost and the Assumption. Each suite consists of five movements: a 'Prelude à l'Introït', 'Offertoire', 'elevation', 'Communion' and 'Piece terminale'. This final piece is no spectacular display piece: as one commentator has written, 'Tournemire seemed to have envisioned a period of meditation for the devout at the conclusion of the Mass rather than the usual noisy and hurried movements of the congregation toward the door.' Tournemire had himself been a pupil of Cesar Franck, and wrote, as Franck had done, for the full disposition of Cavaille-Coll organs which became synonymous worldwide with the musical equivalent of the Gothic revival. Tjeerd van der Ploeg made this recording in 1995 on the Mutin organ of the Eglise Saint-Pierre in Douai, France. This reissue makes an attractive sequel to his extensive 4CD collection of Tournemire's organ works outside L'orgue mystique (95983). The technical specifications of the organ is included in the booklet, which also features an essay on Tournemire by van der Ploeg.'Tjeerd van der Ploeg plays the Mutin organ in the Saint-Pierre in Douai in an extremely imaginative manner and although he does not originate from the "Roman" tradition, he knows how to evoke the mystique of incense and pointed arches' (Luister). 'An excellent interpretation of Tournemire's subtle Impressionism, thanks to the clear recording and the tone-colours: enthusiastically recommended' (Nederlands Dagblad).- Charles Tournemire was born in Bordeaux in 1870. A child prodigy he became organiste-accompagnateur at age 11 at the St. Pierre in Bordeaux. At the Paris Conservatory he had lessons from de Beriot and Cesar Franck, after whose death he continued with Charles-Marie Widor. In 1891 he became organist of the famous Basilika St. Clotilde in Paris, a post he held till his death in 1939.- As a composer Tournemire was influenced by his teachers Franck and Widor. He expanded their harmonic system even more, using Gregorian Chant and even exotic elements from India to create a truly symphonic sound fresco of unprecedented scope and richness, evoking the mystical aspects of the Catholic faith.- This recording presents a wide selection from the liturgical cycle L'Orgue Mystique. This work consists of paraphrases of Gregorian melodies for Sundays and principal feasts of the liturgical year in three cycles: the Christmas Cycle, the Easter Cycle and the Cycle after Pentecost, divided into 51 offices, each having the same structure. It took Tournemire five years to complete this 'magnum opus' (from 1927 to 1932). In this cycle, he merged the symphonic, impressionistic style of organ music with liturgy.- Played by Dutch organist Tjeerd van der Ploeg at the great Mutin organ of the Collegiate Church St. Pierre, Douai, France, an impressive instrument built in 1922, one of the finest symphonic organs of France. - Tjeerd van der Ploeg's previous set of organ works by Tournemire on Brilliant Classics (BC 95983) received enthusiastic reviews in the international press.
A substantial survey of a modern landmark in French organ literature, full of colour, mystery and joy. If any organ music anticipates the explosion of lush harmony, unified musico-theological ideas and radical innovation with which Olivier Messiaen renewed the long tradition of French organ music, it is L'orgue mystique by Messiaen's one-time teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, Charles Tournemire. In a Bachian spirit of comprehensiveness, Tournemire wrote 51 suites for nearly every Sunday and select feast days of the church year. Gregorian chant permeates Tournemire's music, with motives drawn from the appointed proper chants for the day. On this 5CD collection, the Dutch organist presents 23 of the suites, in whole or in part, and arranges them according to the church year, with individual discs dedicated to the Sundays around Christmas and Epiphany, Easter, Pentecost and the Assumption. Each suite consists of five movements: a 'Prelude à l'Introït', 'Offertoire', 'elevation', 'Communion' and 'Piece terminale'. This final piece is no spectacular display piece: as one commentator has written, 'Tournemire seemed to have envisioned a period of meditation for the devout at the conclusion of the Mass rather than the usual noisy and hurried movements of the congregation toward the door.' Tournemire had himself been a pupil of Cesar Franck, and wrote, as Franck had done, for the full disposition of Cavaille-Coll organs which became synonymous worldwide with the musical equivalent of the Gothic revival. Tjeerd van der Ploeg made this recording in 1995 on the Mutin organ of the Eglise Saint-Pierre in Douai, France. This reissue makes an attractive sequel to his extensive 4CD collection of Tournemire's organ works outside L'orgue mystique (95983). The technical specifications of the organ is included in the booklet, which also features an essay on Tournemire by van der Ploeg.'Tjeerd van der Ploeg plays the Mutin organ in the Saint-Pierre in Douai in an extremely imaginative manner and although he does not originate from the "Roman" tradition, he knows how to evoke the mystique of incense and pointed arches' (Luister). 'An excellent interpretation of Tournemire's subtle Impressionism, thanks to the clear recording and the tone-colours: enthusiastically recommended' (Nederlands Dagblad).- Charles Tournemire was born in Bordeaux in 1870. A child prodigy he became organiste-accompagnateur at age 11 at the St. Pierre in Bordeaux. At the Paris Conservatory he had lessons from de Beriot and Cesar Franck, after whose death he continued with Charles-Marie Widor. In 1891 he became organist of the famous Basilika St. Clotilde in Paris, a post he held till his death in 1939.- As a composer Tournemire was influenced by his teachers Franck and Widor. He expanded their harmonic system even more, using Gregorian Chant and even exotic elements from India to create a truly symphonic sound fresco of unprecedented scope and richness, evoking the mystical aspects of the Catholic faith.- This recording presents a wide selection from the liturgical cycle L'Orgue Mystique. This work consists of paraphrases of Gregorian melodies for Sundays and principal feasts of the liturgical year in three cycles: the Christmas Cycle, the Easter Cycle and the Cycle after Pentecost, divided into 51 offices, each having the same structure. It took Tournemire five years to complete this 'magnum opus' (from 1927 to 1932). In this cycle, he merged the symphonic, impressionistic style of organ music with liturgy.- Played by Dutch organist Tjeerd van der Ploeg at the great Mutin organ of the Collegiate Church St. Pierre, Douai, France, an impressive instrument built in 1922, one of the finest symphonic organs of France. - Tjeerd van der Ploeg's previous set of organ works by Tournemire on Brilliant Classics (BC 95983) received enthusiastic reviews in the international press.
5028421972671
Lorgue Mystique (Selection)
Artist: Tournemire / Tjeerd Ploeg Van Der
Format: CD
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A substantial survey of a modern landmark in French organ literature, full of colour, mystery and joy. If any organ music anticipates the explosion of lush harmony, unified musico-theological ideas and radical innovation with which Olivier Messiaen renewed the long tradition of French organ music, it is L'orgue mystique by Messiaen's one-time teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, Charles Tournemire. In a Bachian spirit of comprehensiveness, Tournemire wrote 51 suites for nearly every Sunday and select feast days of the church year. Gregorian chant permeates Tournemire's music, with motives drawn from the appointed proper chants for the day. On this 5CD collection, the Dutch organist presents 23 of the suites, in whole or in part, and arranges them according to the church year, with individual discs dedicated to the Sundays around Christmas and Epiphany, Easter, Pentecost and the Assumption. Each suite consists of five movements: a 'Prelude à l'Introït', 'Offertoire', 'elevation', 'Communion' and 'Piece terminale'. This final piece is no spectacular display piece: as one commentator has written, 'Tournemire seemed to have envisioned a period of meditation for the devout at the conclusion of the Mass rather than the usual noisy and hurried movements of the congregation toward the door.' Tournemire had himself been a pupil of Cesar Franck, and wrote, as Franck had done, for the full disposition of Cavaille-Coll organs which became synonymous worldwide with the musical equivalent of the Gothic revival. Tjeerd van der Ploeg made this recording in 1995 on the Mutin organ of the Eglise Saint-Pierre in Douai, France. This reissue makes an attractive sequel to his extensive 4CD collection of Tournemire's organ works outside L'orgue mystique (95983). The technical specifications of the organ is included in the booklet, which also features an essay on Tournemire by van der Ploeg.'Tjeerd van der Ploeg plays the Mutin organ in the Saint-Pierre in Douai in an extremely imaginative manner and although he does not originate from the "Roman" tradition, he knows how to evoke the mystique of incense and pointed arches' (Luister). 'An excellent interpretation of Tournemire's subtle Impressionism, thanks to the clear recording and the tone-colours: enthusiastically recommended' (Nederlands Dagblad).- Charles Tournemire was born in Bordeaux in 1870. A child prodigy he became organiste-accompagnateur at age 11 at the St. Pierre in Bordeaux. At the Paris Conservatory he had lessons from de Beriot and Cesar Franck, after whose death he continued with Charles-Marie Widor. In 1891 he became organist of the famous Basilika St. Clotilde in Paris, a post he held till his death in 1939.- As a composer Tournemire was influenced by his teachers Franck and Widor. He expanded their harmonic system even more, using Gregorian Chant and even exotic elements from India to create a truly symphonic sound fresco of unprecedented scope and richness, evoking the mystical aspects of the Catholic faith.- This recording presents a wide selection from the liturgical cycle L'Orgue Mystique. This work consists of paraphrases of Gregorian melodies for Sundays and principal feasts of the liturgical year in three cycles: the Christmas Cycle, the Easter Cycle and the Cycle after Pentecost, divided into 51 offices, each having the same structure. It took Tournemire five years to complete this 'magnum opus' (from 1927 to 1932). In this cycle, he merged the symphonic, impressionistic style of organ music with liturgy.- Played by Dutch organist Tjeerd van der Ploeg at the great Mutin organ of the Collegiate Church St. Pierre, Douai, France, an impressive instrument built in 1922, one of the finest symphonic organs of France. - Tjeerd van der Ploeg's previous set of organ works by Tournemire on Brilliant Classics (BC 95983) received enthusiastic reviews in the international press.
        
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